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Crisis Counselling

Course CodeBPS304
Fee CodeS3
Duration (approx)100 hours
QualificationStatement of Attainment

Study Crisis Counselling to support people who have experienced a crisis or trauma.

This course will help you to -

  • Develop your ability to effectively counsel and assist clients in times of crisis.
  • Improve your knowledge of counselling and crisis counselling skills.
  • Learn more about methods of crisis intervention.
  • Understand developmental crisis.
  • Learn more about post-traumatic stress disorder.
  • Dealing with violence and sexual assault.
  • Understand crises and cultural issues.

This course is suitable for people already working in the counselling industry.

  • Do you wish to increase your knowledge and skills to give specialised counselling?
  • Gain comprehensive counselling training in Crisis Counselling, valuable learning for those wishing to work in this field.

Lesson Structure

There are 9 lessons in this course:

  1. Understanding methods of crisis intervention
    • What constitutes a crisis and methods of crisis intervention?
  2. Ethical, professional and legal issues
    • Current ethical, professional and legal implications of crisis intervention.
  3. Dangers of crises and effective intervention
    • Dangers posed by crisis to the individual, the counsellor, and those around them. Determining effective modes of intervention.
  4. Developmental Crises
    • Recognising and comprehending crises from a developmental perspective.
  5. Post-traumatic stress disorder
    • Symptoms, treatment options and possible outcomes of post-traumatic stress disorder.
  6. Violence and sexual assault
    • Effects of violence and sexual assault on the individual, and possible modes of intervention.
  7. Crisis and drug addiction
    • Determining the relationship between crises and drug dependence.
  8. Family crises
    • Major issues raises in family crises and appropriate methods of intervention.
  9. Crises and cultural issues
    • Cultural influences on crisis situations.

Each lesson culminates in an assignment which is submitted to the school, marked by the school's tutors and returned to you with any relevant suggestions, comments, and if necessary, extra reading.

What You Will Do

  • Role play a critical incident debriefing session
  • Familiarise yourself with the Australian Counselling Association Code of Conduct
  • Interview a counsellor from a community mental health service in your area
  • View films, read or listen to stories (where possible) about personal or family crises
  • Discuss post-traumatic stress disorder with a community mental health worker
  • Explore physical, emotional, cognitive and social responses to sexual assault or violence
  • Examine the relationship between trauma and drugs
  • Interview or observe people from other cultures to identify cultural and sub-cultural responses to crises
  • Explore how sub-cultural groups may require different counselling approaches
  • Consider various methods of crisis intervention.

What Creates a Crisis?

Some people can find any change in their lives may trigger a crisis. For others, who are more adaptable, it may only be extreme change that causes a feeling of crisis.  It is important to recognise that the event is in itself not the crisis; but it is the reaction to an event that results in a feeling of losing control, and that is the crisis.
 
When a person experiences a crisis it generally represents a period of instability in their life brought about by an event, and following this event things will never be the same again. Grief and trauma can be regarded as particular types of crisis.
 
Although we tend to think of crises as being negative life events, a crisis need not always be a change for the worse - it can actually mark the beginning of something better
 
A negative crisis may be when a person experiences an unpleasant event, such as a car accident, burglary, loss of their job, death of a friend or family member, and so on. However, life changing events are not always all negative. Having a baby is a massive change in a person’s life. We usually see it as a positive thing - bringing this new person into the world, a new life.  However, the parents and family will also experience great changes. They have to get used to new routines, taking care of the baby’s needs - making sure it is clean, dry and well fed.  Most parents find this difficult at times, but for some parents having a baby can produce a profoundly negative effect. For example, some women may experience post-natal depression or find it hard to cope with working and having children, or fathers might find it hard to cope with having a child in the house that continually needs their help. This is where a seemingly positive life changing event can also have negative impacts on a person’s life.  
 
A new job is another example. A person may be promoted and may be happy about their new job - their higher salary, their increased status. Alternatively, they may find it hard to cope with the demands of the new job. For example, there may be increased travel, more time away from home, more socialising, pressure to speak in public which they do not enjoy, and so on.  All this can cause a crisis in the person’s life, even though the promotion is a positive event.
 
There are numerous types of events which can bring about changes in a person's life. Some of them include:
  • Abuse - physical, emotional, mental.
  • Death - of a family member, partner, close friend, pet.
  • Serious injury - perhaps with long-term consequences e.g. paraplegia, brain trauma.
  • Illness – mental, physical.
  • Long or short-term loss of abilities – mental, physical.
  • Ending relationships – spouse, family, social, work.
  • Loss of assets - home, business, family.
  • Developmental crises - failure to reach developmental milestones.
  • Sexual assault - rape, enforced sexual acts, even verbal abuse.
  • Natural disasters - hurricanes, earthquakes, tsunami, lightning strikes, bushfires, floods.
  • War - civil war, wars between countries.
  • Acts of terrorism.
  • Kidnapping - and torture.
  • Crime - victim of burglary, theft, vandalism, and so forth.  

Learn to Respond to Crisis

This course not only helps you understand the psychology which causes a person to feel in crisis; but also how to make appropriate decisions about appropriate responses in a crisis situation.

This is a valuable skill that anyone working in a helping profession can benefit from. This course can enhance your knowledge, ability and awareness as a volunteer or professional counsellor, health or welfare professional, emergency services worker, a student of psychology or anything else where you have a need to understand this subject.

Understand more about crisis counselling and effective support of clients who have experienced a crisis with this great Crisis Counselling course.

  • This course is suitable for those already working in the counselling industry and who wish to improve their knowledge and practice of helping people through crises.
  • Suitable for CPD/Professional Development.
  • Enrol now to improve your job and career prospects by increasing your knowledge of crisis counselling.


Meet some of our academics

Jade SciasciaBiologist, Business Coordinator, Government Environmental Dept, Secondary School teacher (Biology); Recruitment Consultant, Senior Supervisor in Youth Welfare, Horse Riding Instructor (part-completed) and Boarding Kennel Manager. Jade has a B.Sc.Biol, Dip.Professional Education, Cert IV TESOL, Cert Food Hygiene.
Lyn QuirkM.Prof.Ed.; Adv.Dip.Compl.Med (Naturopathy); Adv.Dip.Sports Therapy Over 30 years as Health Club Manager, Fitness Professional, Teacher, Coach and Business manager in health, fitness and leisure industries. As business owner and former department head for TAFE, she brings a wealth of skills and experience to her role as a tutor for ACS.
Tracey JonesWidely published author, Psychologist, Manager and Lecturer. Over 10 years working with ACS and 25 years of industry experience. Qualifications include: B.Sc. (Hons) (Psychology), M.Soc.Sc (social work), Dip. SW (social work), PGCE (Education), PGD (Learning Disability Studies).
Gavin ColePsychologist, Educator, Author, Psychotherapist. B.Sc., Psych.Cert., M. Psych. Cert.Garden Design, MACA Gavin is both a highly experienced Psychologist and tutor. Gavin has over 25 years experience in the Psychology industry, and has been working with ACS since 2001. He has worked in both Australia and England, and has been involved in writing numerous books and courses in Psychology and Counselling


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