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Qualification - Certificate in Stress Management

Course CodeVPS021
Fee CodeCT
Duration (approx)600 hours
QualificationCertificate

Learn about Stress Management

  • Apply strategies to yourself, as well as using them to help others.
  • The course requires the completion of SIX 100 hour modules.
  • There are three CORE modules of - Personal Energy Management, Stress Management and Life Coaching.
  • You then choose three ELECTIVE modules from a range of psychology, fitness, nutrition and health courses. You can find more information below -

In this course we deal with physical problems related to stress, how to achieve easy living, dealing with drugs, developing self esteem, relaxation, diet and much more.

Modules

Core ModulesThese modules provide foundation knowledge for the Qualification - Certificate in Stress Management.
 Personal Energy Management VRE105
 Stress Management VPS100
 Life Coaching BPS305
 
Elective ModulesIn addition to the core modules, students study any 3 of the following 14 modules.
 Anger Management BPS111
 Counselling Skills I BPS109
 Counselling Skills II BPS110
 Health and Fitness I (Fitness Leadership) BRE101
 Human Biology 1A (Anatomy and Physiology) BSC101
 Human Nutrition and Food 1 BRE102
 Introduction To Psychology BPS101
 Counselling Techniques BPS206
 Grief Counselling BPS209
 Human Nutrition II BRE202
 Nutrition For Weight Control BRE210
 Business Coaching BBS304
 Human Nutrition III (Disease & Nutrition) BRE302
 Nutrition for Sports BRE303
 

Note that each module in the Qualification - Certificate in Stress Management is a short course in its own right, and may be studied separately.


Understanding the Causes of Stress 

The first step toward managing stress in an individual, is to recognise what is causing it. 
If stress isn't recognised and dealt with, there will be a risk of deterioration in mental (and probably physical) health.

Consider:

SOCIAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS

 
How we live, work, our friends and family and how we relax can have a big impact on our mental health.  
 
Where we live - For example, if we live in a stressful environment, this can affect our levels of stress, for example, a poor area, high crime rates, problems with neighbours etc.
 
Where we work - A person may enjoy their work, but if they feel under pressure, or they do not enjoy their job, or they cannot find a job or keep a job, this can affect their mental well being.
 
Problems in communities such as unemployment, underemployment, poverty, migration, and so forth have been linked to mental disorders. Also, social class or socioeconomic status is known to play a role.  Insecure education, occupation, economic and social position is also a possible factor.
 
 
How we relax - How a person relaxes can affect how much stress they feel. They may not have a place they find relaxing or the time to relax.  
 
Maltreatment - Maltreatment during childhood and adulthood, such as sexual, mental, physical abuse, domestic violence, neglect, bullying and so on has been linked to the development of mental disorders, but it is thought to be due to the complex interaction between family, society and biological factors.
 
 
Negative Life Events – These have been linked to a range of disorders, such as anxiety disorders and mood disorders, but the main risk seems to be due to cumulative complications over time, but sometimes a single major trauma can lead t mental disorder, such as post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).
 
 
Family and Friends - Relationship factors have been linked to the development of mental disorders. There is much debate on how important family, friends, peer group, home environment, work and school are.  Other issues such as parental depression, parenting skills and other problems, such as parental divorce, social privation and so on can be implicated. 
 
 

PHYSICAL FACTORS

 
Physical factors are those that are biological.
 
 
Genes - A person may inherit a gene that can put them at more risk of mental illness. Twin and adoption studies have found that genetics do play a part in mental disorders.  For example, they study two twins and see if there is a similar level of mental illness. Or they might look at children who have been adopted.
 
For example, Child 1 is born into a family with a parent who has schizophrenia. Child 1 is then adopted by a family with no history of schizophrenia. So there is no environmental factor. If Child 1 then develops schizophrenia, we would think that there was a strong genetic link.
 
But if Child 2 was born into a family with no history of schizophrenia, but adopted by a family with a parent with schizophrenia, if the child then developed schizophrenia, we would think that there was a strong environmental link.  Twin and adoption studies have found a genetic link to schizophrenia, but they have also found social factors can influence this.  
 
 
Brain Injury - They may suffer a head injury.  Higher rates of substance abuse disorders, and mood and psychotic disorders have been found following a traumatic brain injury.  This has been linked though to pre-existing mental health conditions and also effects of the injury and factors relating to their personality.
 
 
Factors in Pregnancy - There may be factors that arose when their mother was pregnant including maternal exposure to serious stress or trauma, birth complications, infections, famine, gestational exposure to cocaine, alcohol, etc.  Exposure to some chemicals during pregnancy has also been linked to mental illness.
 
 
Pathogens - Some psychiatric disorders have been linked to pathogens. The research has mainly been via animal studies, but there has been some inconsistent human evidence. There have been some inconsistent findings of the link between Toxoplasma gondii and schizophrenia,
but the link is unclear.
 
 
Poor General Health - Poor general health has been found in some adults with severe mental illnesses. It is not known whether there is a direct or indirect link, but factors such as exercise levels, medication, socioeconomic factors, poor health care provision, bad diet, and so on have been linked.  Some vitamin and mineral deficiencies have also been related to mental health.
 
 
 

PSYCHOLOGICAL FACTORS

 
Our mental and emotional state can influence us. For example, traumatic experiences in the present or past can affect us. Significant life events and other factors can also influence our mental health, 
 
 
 
 If you want to help others who are stressed
Or improve your own stress with these useful techniques
Then learn more about stress management with this certificate level course.
Enrol now to find out more.
 


Meet some of our academics

Lyn QuirkM.Prof.Ed.; Adv.Dip.Compl.Med (Naturopathy); Adv.Dip.Sports Therapy Over 30 years as Health Club Manager, Fitness Professional, Teacher, Coach and Business manager in health, fitness and leisure industries. As business owner and former department head for TAFE, she brings a wealth of skills and experience to her role as a tutor for ACS.
Tracey JonesWidely published author, Psychologist, Manager and Lecturer. Over 10 years working with ACS and 25 years of industry experience. Qualifications include: B.Sc. (Hons) (Psychology), M.Soc.Sc (social work), Dip. SW (social work), PGCE (Education), PGD (Learning Disability Studies).
Gavin ColePsychologist, Educator, Author, Psychotherapist. B.Sc., Psych.Cert., M. Psych. Cert.Garden Design, MACA Gavin is both a highly experienced Psychologist and tutor. Gavin has over 25 years experience in the Psychology industry, and has been working with ACS since 2001. He has worked in both Australia and England, and has been involved in writing numerous books and courses in Psychology and Counselling


Check out our eBooks

Psychological ProfilingPsychological profiling is used to assess anyone from potential new staff and school children to serial killers. It helps you to determine someone’s personality, neuroses, mental health and career suitability. This book provides an excellent overview of psychological profiling techniques and pitfalls.
How to be a Life CoachLife coaching is a relatively new profession - although coaches have been around for a long time in the guise of trainers, instructors, managers and tutors for various professions and disciplines. Life coaching is not easily defined, but it is a type of mentoring which focuses on helping individuals to achieve what they would like to achieve and thereby to lead more fulfilling lives. Unlike other forms of coaching, it takes place outside of the workplace and is concerned with all aspects of a person’s life.
Coping Better with Negative EmotionsThis book is designed to help you understand the things that cause stress, the problems that can arise, and the broad range of ways people might manage their stress.
Drug and Addiction CounsellingThis eBook examines what addiction is, the physical and emotional effects of substance related disorders, and the different treatments available to help a person to control their disorder.