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Sales Management

Course CodeBBS102
Fee CodeS3
Duration (approx)100 hours
QualificationStatement of Attainment

ONLINE STUDY SALES MANAGEMENT

Selling More is Good; provided Sales are Managed

There's more to sales management than just making sales. That's why only some sales staff ever become a sales manager. If you aspire to climb the ladder and advance your career in sales & marketing; this course is a great starting point.

For any company or organisation to have success financially it must have a desirable product. This product must be of need to a large proportion of the general public. Advertising, using all available media outlets, should get the message across. But the most important link after the manufacturing and advertising (marketing) is the salesperson/sales representative - The person who actually sells the product to the consumer. Without him, the financial/corporate world would come to a halt!

This course will take you from developing a strong personality (confidence and knowledge) through to communication, marketing, dealing with upper management, getting to know your product, the A B C of selling, the opening and closing or a sale, stress management, how to increase your company's profits, etc.

 
 

Lesson Structure

There are 9 lessons in this course:

  1. Developing Sales Concepts
    • Goods & Services, Ways of Managing Sales, Developing a Sales Concept, Planning Ahead, Understanding Selling, Understanding Buyers, Steps in the Sales Order, Increasing Sales
  2. Developing Sales Relationships
    • Sales Methods, Presentation & the Selling Personality (personality traits of a salesperson), Communication skills and conversational selling
  3. Sales Ethics
    • The Law and Ethics, Social Problems, Pricing, Deceit, High Pressure Sales, Poor Quality Products, Predetermined Obsolescence, The Impact of Marketing and Selling on Society, Public Responses to Modern Marketing Trends (eg. Consumerism, Environmentalism etc), Enlightened Marketing
  4. Building Product Knowledge
    • Good & Bad Features (eg. Make/trade name; Model; Purpose or use; How & where it is manufactured; Materials used; Wholesale/retail price; Guarantees; Warranty; Spare parts (availability and location); Service Costs)
    • Knowing the Competition etc.
  5. Developing a Customer Strategy
    • Types of Buyers, Buyer Motivation, Difficult Buyers, Key Rules for Every Salesperson
  6. Presentation Strategy Options
    • Displays (eg. Locating Your Displays For Best Results), Shop Layout, Trade Displays etc.
  7. Closing a Sale
    • Difficulties with closing a sale & solutions, importance of the personal approach.
  8. Managing Yourself
    • Time management, Territory management, Record Management, Sales Records, Stress Management
  9. Managing a Sales Team
    • Building quality partnerships.

Each lesson culminates in an assignment which is submitted to the school, marked by the school's tutors and returned to you with any relevant suggestions, comments, and if necessary, extra reading.

Aims

  • Explain how a sales concept reflects and aids the marketing goals of an organization.
  • Identify key ways to develop good sales relationships with customers and others.
  • Identify ethical and legal considerations in sales.
  • Explain the importance of product knowledge and what it includes.
  • Explain the role of a developed customer strategy and how to create one.
  • Identify elements of good product presentation.
  • Explain the stages of a sale and how to achieve results.
  • Describe the importance of self-management to sales success.
  • Identify and explain key methods for managing a sales team.
  • Identify and explain key methods for managing a sales team.

How to Sell Through Distributors

Wholesaling involves selling products through distributors, who will then resell at a higher price to their customers. Primary production and manufacturing industries (or their agents) commonly sell products this way.

Producers of goods in many industries commonly sell their products at a discounted price to retailers using the following strategies:

Self marketing
If a business is large (or profitable) enough, or an industry appropriately structured, the producer may retail their own products. For example wholesale plant nurseries frequently sell their plants direct to the retail nurseries. These might be sold from the back of a truck calling on retail nurseries, or perhaps by taking orders over the phone off a catalogue.

Cooperatives
This generally involves a number of different businesses joining together to form a joint marketing effort. In many farming areas, for instance, a number of individual farmers may form a cooperative. The cooperative may be able to afford to develop and operate a processing or packaging facility, which would not be viable for a farmer to do alone. Each of the participating farmers will perhaps own shares in the operation.

Agencies
Agencies operate in many different industries with the sole purpose of marketing products produced by other businesses. Examples include:

  • Farmers who send their produce to a central market which is frequented by buyers. Agents maintain permanent offices or stalls in those markets from which they represent and sell produce for their clients, the farmers, collecting a fee (commonly a percentage).
  • Book distribution agencies that specialise in supplying books from the publisher to the retail outlets such as bookshops and newsagencies. The books are generally supplied to the distributor on a consignment basis. The distributor then sells the books to retailers on a sale or return basis.

Regulated Systems
Government departments, statutory authorities and other agencies have been established in different industries in various countries, with the role of controlling the marketing of particular products. Examples include the Department of Trade, the American Sheep Industry Association and the Australian Wheat Board. 

Using Intermediaries
Wholesaling intermediaries are firms that handle the distribution of products from the manufacturer to the retailer or business user. Wholesaling intermediaries can be independent or owned by the manufacturers.

Independent Intermediaries
Independent intermediaries are not owned or controlled by any manufacturer. They do business with many different manufacturers and customers. Both merchant wholesalers and merchant brokers are examples of independent intermediaries.

Merchant wholesalers buy goods from manufacturers and sell them to retailers. Because they purchase the goods, they become the legal owners of the goods (ie. they take ‘title’ to them), which means they can set their own prices and develop their own marketing strategies for those goods. Taking title carries risks though: the merchant wholesaler may suffer losses if the goods don’t sell, or are stolen, or damaged, or become obsolete or out-of-date.

The services provided by merchant wholesalers include delivery, credit, repairs and marketing assistance. Many merchant wholesalers have their own sales force that visit businesses and maintain product displays. Some merchant wholesalers provide a more limited service, although they still take title to the goods. Examples of limited merchandising wholesalers include the following:

  • Mail order wholesalers – sell products to small retailers through catalogues or the internet, rather than a sales force. Payment is by cash or credit prior to delivery. Often used by small businesses in remote areas.
  • Online sellers -many of these may take orders, without actually holding stock; then pass those orders back to the producer or manufacturer to make the deliveries; keepin a % of the money paid.
  • Cash-and-carry wholesalers – provide low-cost goods to small retailers. The retailer pays cash directly at the wholesaler’s premises and organises delivery of their purchases.
  • Truck jobbers – deliver goods to small businesses for their inspection. Often used to sell cigarettes and perishable goods such as bread, fruit, vegetables and plants.

Merchant agents and brokers provide services in exchange for commissions. They do not take title to the product, although they may take possession for a short time. Agents tend to represent buyers or sellers on an ongoing basis, while brokers are engaged for a short period. Types of merchant agents include the following:

  • Manufacturer’s agents or reps – are independent salespeople contracted by manufacturers to sell products. Agents generally carry a range of lines of non-competing products, for which they receive a percentage when they make a sale. Their contract with the manufacturer specifies such things as selling prices and sales territory.
  • Selling agents – salespeople who market a whole product line or the manufacturer’s entire stock. .Selling agents have unlimited territories and control over the distribution, pricing and promotion of the products. Includes import/export agents working in the furniture, textiles and clothing industries.
  • Commission merchants – sales agents generally selling agricultural products on consignment.. The seller may specify a minimum price, but the agent is free to sell for the highest price they can get, and they receive a commission on the sales price.
  • Merchant brokers – intermediaries that identify and bring sellers and buyers together in return for a fee when the transaction is completed. Generally brokers work in markets with lots of small buyers and sellers such as real estate and used equipment.

Manufacturer-Owned Intermediaries
Some large firms have their own intermediary channels. This allows them to have complete control over their operations even though they are run as separate business facilities. Examples include sales branches and sales offices which provide sales and services to specific geographic areas.



Meet some of our academics

Denise Hodges Promotions Manager for ABC retail, Fitness Programmer/Instructor, Small Business Owner, Marketing Coordinator (Laserpoint). Over 20 years varied experienced in business and marketing. More recently Denise studied naturopathy to share her passion for health and wellness. Denise has an Adv.Dip.Bus., Dip. Clothing Design, Adv.Dip.Naturopathy (completing).
Gavin ColeGavin has over 20 years of industry experience in Psychology, Landscaping, Publishing, Writing and Education. Former operations manager for highly reputable Landscape firm, The Chelsea Gardener, before starting his own firm. Gavin has a B.Sc., Psych.Cert., M. Psych. Cert.Garden Design, MACA.
Lyn QuirkM.Prof.Ed.; Adv.Dip.Compl.Med (Naturopathy); Adv.Dip.Sports Therapy Over 30 years as Health Club Manager, Fitness Professional, Teacher, Coach and Business manager in health, fitness and leisure industries. As business owner and former department head for TAFE, she brings a wealth of skills and experience to her role as a tutor for ACS.
Kate GibsonKate has 12 years experience as a marketing advisor and experience as a project manager. Kate has traveled and worked in a variety of locations including London, New Zealand and Australia. Kate has a B.Soc.Sc, Post-Grad. Dip. Org Behaviour (HR).


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