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Therapeutic Nutrition

Course CodeBRE211
Fee CodeS3
Duration (approx)100 hours
QualificationStatement of Attainment

Learn to manage the diet of people with a medical condition.

Illness and Recovery can often be managed by planning a better diet. This course shows you how different foods relate to different illnesses.

The practice of therapeutic nutrition involves the provision of nutrients to maintain and/ or restore optimal nutrition and health.

Therapeutic diets may be required as therapy for a disease e.g. coeliac disease or to treat malnutrition arising from low energy and nutrient intakes or due to increased energy and nutrient needs.

A therapeutic diet may be provided orally (through eating/ drinking), enterally (through a tube directly into the gastrointestinal tract or parenterally through the veins of the circulatory system.

Course Structure

There are 9 lessons in this course:

1. Introduction to Therapeutic Nutrition

 

  • What is Therapeutic Nutrition
  • Where is it Applied
  • Oral Nutrition
  • Nausea and Vomiting
  • Swallowing Problems
  • Weight Loss & Reduced Appetite
  • Nutritional Supplement
  • Artifical Nutrition
  • Enteral Nutrition
  • Parenteral Nutrition (Hyperalimentation)

 

2. Allergies and Intolerances

 

  • Food Allergy
  • Foot Intolerance
  • Diagnosis of Food Allergy or Intolerance
  • Dietary Management of Food Allergy and Intolerance
  • Peanut Allergy
  • Cow's Milk Allergy
  • Coeliac Disease

 

3. Diabetes

 

  • What is Diabetes?
  • Types of Diabetes
  • Complications Associated with Diabetes
  • Prevention and Treatment
  • Monitoring of Diabetes
  • Therapeutic Nutrition & Diabetes

 

4. Heart Disease, Hyperlipidemia and Arteriosclerosis

 

  • Introduction
  • Modifiable Risk Factors
  • Dietary Fat & Cholesterol
  • Other Dietary Factors

 

5. Renal/Kidney Conditions

 

  • Glomerulonephritis, Acute & Chronic
  • Nephrotic Syndrome
  • Nephrosclerosis
  • Acute Renal Failure (ARF)
  • Chronic Renal Failure (CRF)
  • Eating the right amount of Energy
  • Fluid Restrictions
  • Sodium Restrictions
  • Diet & Kidney Stones

 

6. Cancer

 

  • Dietary Factors associated with Cancer
  • Cancer Therapy
  • Nutritional Side-Effects and Suggested Dietary Management

 

7. Digestive Disorders & Diet - Oesophagus, Small Intestine, Colon

 

  • Introduction
  • Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)
  • Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD): Crohn's Disease, Diverticulitis & Ulcerative Colitis

 

8. Other Metabolic Conditions (eg. Liver, Gall bladder, Pancreas, etc)

 

  • The Liver
  • Hepatitis
  • Cirrhosis
  • The Gallbladder
  • Gall Stones
  • The Pancreas
  • Acute Pancreatitis
  • Chronic Pancreatitis

 

9. Strategic Diet planning for a medical condition

Each lesson culminates in an assignment which is submitted to the school, marked by the school's tutors and returned to you with any relevant suggestions, comments, and if necessary, extra reading.

 
 

Aims

  • Discuss the nature and scope of Therapeutic Nutrition; and identify circumstances where diet may need modification
  • Explain different types of food allergy and intolerance and provide information on diagnosis, clinical symptoms and appropriate dietary modifications.
  • Explain what diabetes is and describe appropriate dietary adjustments that for people with Diabetes.
  • Explain appropriate dietary adjustments that should be made for people with Cardiovascular Disease
  • Explain appropriate dietary adjustments that should be made for people with Heart Disease, Hyperlipidemia or Artheriolsclerosis
  • Explain appropriate dietary adjustments that should be made for people with Kidney conditions
  • Explain appropriate dietary adjustments that should be made for people with different types of cancer
  • Explain appropriate dietary adjustments that should be made for people with a variety of digestive disorders
  • Explain appropriate dietary adjustments that should be made for people with diseases of the liver, gall bladder and pancreas
  • To evaluate the dietary requirements of a client or patient, who has a medical condition; giving appropriate consideration to that condition; and to identify responsible options for diet planning in response to the situation.

LEARN ABOUT MANY DIFFERENT HEALTH PROBLEMS

and THEIR RELATIONSHIP TO WHAT WE EAT

 

Swallowing problems

Chewing and swallowing problems (also called dysphagia) can result from diseases such as stroke, cerebral palsy, Parkinson's disease, muscular dystrophy, multiple sclerosis and dementia. The cause of swallowing difficulties must always be investigated by a doctor. If food and liquid cannot be swallowed safely it may be aspirated or drawn into the lungs. As the airways become blocked, the person will begin to choke and this choking fit may be fatal for frail, elderly people. The aspiration of food and fluid into the lungs can also cause aspiration pneumonia.

Once the cause of swallowing difficulties has been investigated, people may be advised to follow a specific diet. Examples include a minced diet where all food is minced for easier chewing or swallowing and a pureed diet, where a blender or food processor to puree foods to the consistency of baby food, while soft and smooth foods, such as applesauce, puddings and eggs can be served in their normal form. Thickened fluids may be recommended as a remedy to chewing and swallowing problems. Artificial food thickeners are available from the pharmacy while natural thickeners include tapioca, flour and instant potato flakes.

 

Weight loss and reduced appetite

Unintentional weight loss is a decrease in body weight that is not voluntary. In other words, you did not try to loss the weight by dieting or exercising. There are many causes of unintentional weight loss. Examples include, cancer, depression, drugs such as chemotherapy drugs, Eating disorders, loss of appetite and malnutrition. Painful mouth ulcers or a loss of teeth may also prevent someone eating normally and result in weight loss. Weight loss and poor oral intake can have a serious impact on a person’s clinical outcome following a surgical procedure. Causing reduced immune function, poor wound healing and thus, longer hospital stays.

Here are some tips to help people with poor appetite and weight loss, you may think of others-

  • Try to eat small and frequent meals and snacks, for example, every 2 hours. Suitable snacks include cheese and crackers, sandwiches, savory biscuits, ready made desserts such as yogurt, rice pudding and crème caramel.
  • Take advantage of times when you do feel well, and have a larger meal then. Many people have a better appetite first thing in the morning, when they are well rested.
  • If your doctor allows, have a small glass of wine or beer during a meal. It may help to stimulate your appetite
  • During meals, sip only small amounts because drinking may make you feel full. If you want to have more than just a small amount to drink, have it 30-60 minutes before or after a meal.
  • Fortify foods e.g. with milk powder and foods high in fats and sugars.

Example Assignment From the Course

1) Looking back over your food diary, discuss how your diet meets the main nutritional recommendations and highlight any possible nutritional deficiencies. Write between 150 and 200 words.

2) What tips could you offer to someone suffering from nausea/ reduced appetite to help them to increase their nutritional intake? Write around 150 to 200 words.

3) Compare the cost and nutritional composition of 3 different build up drinks. You may find this information by looking at the labels of products available in the local chemist/ supermarket or health food store or by searching for information on the manufacturer’s website on the internet. Alternatively you can often find the nutritional composition of particular products by searching on the internet (you should spend about 1 hour on this task. Submit your results in a table showing the brand, the composition and the cost.

4) Report back on your set task, list the ingredients used in your blended drink and your reasons for including them. Include information on the drinks nutritional composition. If you subsequently made up the product, comment on how it tasted/ looked. Do you think the product would be acceptable to someone with a poor appetite. How much of the product do you think a patient could drink each day? 

You can see from these examples that understanding therapeutic nutrition can be a very involved and complex subject. Even the experts don't know it all; and they can spend their whole lives studying the subject.

This course is a great starting point. It will give you a foundation; and armed with that foundation you can better understand what you read, hear and observe; building your knowledge and expertise of nutrition as you move forward.

 

 


Meet some of our academics

Jade SciasciaBiologist, Business Coordinator, Government Environmental Dept, Secondary School teacher (Biology); Recruitment Consultant, Senior Supervisor in Youth Welfare, Horse Riding Instructor (part-completed) and Boarding Kennel Manager. Jade has a B.Sc.Biol, Dip.Professional Education, Cert IV TESOL, Cert Food Hygiene.
Lyn QuirkM.Prof.Ed.; Adv.Dip.Compl.Med (Naturopathy); Adv.Dip.Sports Therapy Over 30 years as Health Club Manager, Fitness Professional, Teacher, Coach and Business manager in health, fitness and leisure industries. As business owner and former department head for TAFE, she brings a wealth of skills and experience to her role as a tutor for ACS.
Karen LeeNutritional Scientist, Dietician, Teacher and Author. BSc. Hons. (Biological Sciences), Postgraduate Diploma Nutrition and Dietetics. Registered dietitian in the UK, with over 15 years working in the NHS. Karen has undertaken a number of research projects and has lectured to undergraduate university students. Has co authored two books on nutrition and several other books in health sciences.


Check out our eBooks

Human NutritionBoth a text for students, or an informative read for anyone who wants to eat better. While covering the basics, the book approaches nutrition a little differently here to some other books, with sections covering ”Modifying diet according to Genetic Disposition or Lifestyle”, “How to find Reliable Information on Nutrition” and “Understanding how Diet relates to Different Parts of the Body” (including Urinary, Digestive, Respiratory and Circulatory System, the Brain, etc). This ebook was written to complement the ACS Nutrition I course, and provides a solid foundation for anyone wanting to grasp a fundamental understanding of Human Nutrition. 41 pages
Counselling HandbookFull of interesting case studies, this ebook is a wonderful introduction to the complex world of the human psyche. Chapters include: Using Counselling, Seeing Behind the Mask, Emotions and Attitudes, Communicating Better, Theory vs Practice, Diffusing Difficult Situations and Golden Rules for Counselors. 43 pages
Human BiologyFor any new student of human biology, being confronted with thousands of unfamiliar words can be overwhelming. It can also be difficult to identify which words you need to learn first. This book presents words that have been carefully selected as the most important for new biology students to learn and understand. It also provides more information about each word than is often found in traditional dictionaries, giving students a more in-depth understanding of the word's meaning. The book is intended as an aid to all new students of human biology.
Nutritional TherapyDiscover how the way you eat can impact upon the affects of an illness. This book is unique, written by our health and nutritional scientists. Chapters cover: “Scope and Nature of Nutritional Therapy”, “How different factors Interact with Nutrition”, “Different Ways” and “Appropriate Therapeutic Responses for Different Health Issues” Thirty different conditions are covered from Mental Illness and Gastritis to Coeliac Disease and Osteoporosis.